Report: Fifth person accuses Arcade Fire’s Win Butler of sexual misconduct

Report: Fifth person accuses Arcade Fire’s Win Butler of sexual misconduct
Another woman has come forward claiming the Arcade Fire frontman engaged in “manipulative, toxic” behavior over the course of their sexual relationship.

By Raphael Helfand

November 22, 2022

Rich Fury
/

Getty Images

A fifth person has come forward accusing Arcade Fire frontman Win Butler of sexual misconduct, Pitchfork reports. Her claim comes in the wake of a previous article Pitchfork published in August in which four people accused Butler of engaging in similar behavior toward them between 2016 and 2020.

ADVERTISEMENT

The newly published allegation comes from a woman referred to pseudonymously by Pitchfork as Sabina, who claims Butler was emotionally manipulative and abused his power as a rockstar 13 years her senior over the course of a three-year, on-and-off relationship. After meeting Butler at a café in Montreal in the summer of 2015, Sabina (22 and a college student at the time) and Butler (then 35 and a Grammy winner) corresponded over text and met several times, having sex for the first time that fall. Afterward, she claims, Butler repeatedly contacted her for sex and nude photos, establishing a dynamic she now characterizes as “dehumanizing.” Pitchfork reviewed screenshots of text message exchanges between Sabina and Butler — including an apparently unsolicited, graphic photo he sent to her in August 2017 — that back up Sabina’s account.

Read Next:

Following the first set of allegations leveled against Butler, he shared an apology to “anyone who I have hurt with my behavior,” which he attributed in part to drinking and depression, but maintained that all the relationships he’d engaged in during the period in question were consensual. “I am continuing to learn from my mistakes and working hard to become a better person, someone my son can be proud of,” he wrote. His wife and bandmate Régine Chassagne issued a statement in support of her husband, and the band continued its planned European and North American tours despite Feist and Beck both dropping out as supporting acts.

ADVERTISEMENT

A representative of Arcade Fire declined to offer an on-the-record comment on the accusations when reached by The FADER.

ADVERTISEMENT

Feist drops out of Arcade Fire tour

Feist drops out of Arcade Fire tour
“I’m imperfect and I will navigate this decision imperfectly, but what I’m sure of is the best way to take care of my band and crew and my family is to distance myself from this tour, not this conversation.”

By Jordan Darville

September 01, 2022

Feist. Photo via Arts & Crafts.

 

Feist will no longer perform on the remaining dates of her tour with Arcade Fire. The singer announced her cancellations on Thursday (September 1), two days after the beginning of the tour was rocked by allegations of sexual misconduct levied against Arcade Fire frontman Win Butler. Butler has denied the allegations and a source close to the band has said the tour would continue.

ADVERTISEMENT

“At a pub in Dublin, after rehearsing with my band, I read the same headline you did,” Feist’s letter begins. “This has been incredibly difficult for me and I can only imagine how much more difficult it’s been for the people who came forward. More than anything I wish healing to those involved.”

Read Next:

The decision to drop out of the tour came in part due to the perception of solidarity with Butler that Feist’s participation could have engendered. “I was never here to stand for or with Arcade Fire,” Feist writes.” I was here to stand on my own two feet on a stage, a place I’ve grown to feel I belong and I’ve earned as my own.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“We all have a story within a spectrum ranging from baseline toxic masculinity to pervasive misogyny to actually being physically, psychologically, emotionally or sexually assaulted,” Feist continues. “It can be a lonely road to make sense of ill treatment. I can’t solve that by quitting, and I can’t solve it by staying. But I can’t continue.”

“I’m imperfect and I will navigate this decision imperfectly,” the letter concludes, “but what I’m sure of is the best way to take care of my band and crew and my family is to distance myself from this tour, not this conversation… I’ve always written songs to
name my own subtle difficulties, aspire to my best self and claim responsibility when I need to. And I’m claiming my responsibility now and going home.”

Read the full statement below.

ADVERTISEMENT

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by feist (@feistmusic)

Feist performed at the first two shows on Arcade Fire’s tour. At the first show in Dublin, she donated all proceeds from merch sales to the domestic violence charity Women’s Aid Dublin.

ADVERTISEMENT

At a pub in Dublin, after rehearsing with my band, I read the same headline you did. We didn’t have any time to prepare for what was coming let alone a chance to decide

not to fly across the ocean into the belly of this situation. This has been incredibly difficult for me and I can only imagine how much more difficult it’s been for the people who came forward. More than anything I wish healing to those involved.

This has ignited a conversation that is bigger than me, it’s bigger than my songs and it’s certainly bigger than any rock and roll tour. As I tried to get my bearings and figure out my responsibility in this situation, I received dozens of messages from the people around me, expressing sympathy for the dichotomy I have been pushed into. To stay on tour would symbolize I was either defending or ignoring the harm caused by Win Butler and to leave would imply I was the judge and jury.

I was never here to stand for or with Arcade Fire – I was here to stand on my own two feet on a stage, a place I’ve grown to feel I belong and I’ve earned as my own. I play for my band, my crew, their loved ones and all of our families, and the people who pay their hard-earned money to share space in the collective synergy that is a show. The ebb and flow of my successes, failures, and other decisions affect all of our livelihoods and I recognize how lucky I am to be able to travel the world singing songs about my life, my thoughts and experiences and have that be my career. I’ve never taken that for granted.

My experiences include the same experiences as the many people I have spoken to since the news broke on Saturday, and the many strangers whom I may only be able to reach with this letter, or not at all. We all have a story within a spectrum ranging from baseline toxic masculinity to pervasive misogyny to actually being physically, psychologically, emotionally or sexually assaulted. This situation touches each of our lives and speaks to us in a language unique to each of our processing. There isn’t a singular path to heal when you’ve endured any version of the above, nor a singular path to rehabilitate the perpetrators. It can be a lonely road to make sense of ill treatment. I can’t solve that by quitting, and I can’t solve it by staying. But I can’t continue.

Public shaming might cause action, but those actions are made from fear, and fear is not the place we find our best selves or make our best decisions. Fear doesn’t precipitate empathy nor healing nor open a safe space for these kinds of conversations to evolve, or for real accountability and remorse to be offered to the people who were harmed.

I’m imperfect and I will navigate this decision imperfectly, but what I’m sure of is the best way to take care of my band and crew and my family is to distance myself from this tour, not this conversation. The last two nights on stage, my songs made this decision for me. Hearing them through this lens was incongruous with what I’ve worked to clarify for myself through my whole career. I’ve always written songs to name my own subtle difficulties, aspire to my best self and claim responsibility when I need to. And I’m claiming my responsibility now and going home.

Leslie

Two Canadian radio stations “pause” playing Arcade Fire music following Win Butler accusations

Two Canadian radio stations “pause” playing Arcade Fire music following Win Butler accusations
CBC Music and Toronto’s Indie88 will not be playing the band’s songs for the forseeable future.

By David Renshaw

August 31, 2022

Arcade Fire

 

Press

Two radio stations in Canada have confirmed that they will not be playing Arcade Fire music following news this week of multiple allegations of sexual misconduct by four separate people against frontman Win Butler.

ADVERTISEMENT

Ottawa City News reports that CBC will “pause” playing Arcade Fire on both CBC Music FM and the SiriusXM CBC Radio 3 station “until we learn more about the situation.” Toronto’s Indie88 also confirmed that “a quick decision” had been made to pull the band’s music with a “fulsome internal conversation about the permanence of this decision” to follow.

Read Next:

The allegations, which Butler denies, include claims of unwanted sexual messages and one of sexually assault. The band kicked off their European tour in Dublin, Ireland on Tuesday night with support act Feist donating merch proceeds to a local domestic abuse charity.

ADVERTISEMENT

Report: Feist will donate proceeds from merch sales at Arcade Fire show in Dublin to domestic violence group

Report: Feist will donate proceeds from merch sales at Arcade Fire show in Dublin to domestic violence group
Arcade Fire are beginning their tour in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against frontman Win Butler; Feist is one of the openers listed.

By Jordan Darville

August 30, 2022

Feist. Photo via Arts & Crafts.

 

Tonight (August 31), Arcade Fire will perform in Dublin’s 3Arena, the band’s first concert since frontman Win Butler was accused of sexual misconduct (Butler has denied these claims). Opening for the band’s first run of dates is Feist, and according to Pitchfork, a sign at her merch tent says that she will donate “all proceeds” from tonight’s merch sales to domestic violence charity Women’s Aid Dublin.

ADVERTISEMENT

Feist is donating proceeds from the merch at the Arcade Fire show tonight to Women’s Aid Dublin pic.twitter.com/36Q3lyYXSL

— kevin freeburn (@KevFreeburn) August 30, 2022

ADVERTISEMENT

Yesterday, a source confirmed to The FADER that Arcade Fire’s tour will proceed as planned. Representatives for Feist and Beck, the tour’s other opener, did not respond to requests for comment.

Butler was accused of misconduct by three women and one gender-fluid person from alleged incidents taking place between 2015 and 2020. He has called the allegations “revisionist, and frankly wrong,” claiming that each sexual encounter was consensual.

The FADER has reached out to representatives for Feist and Arcade Fire for more information. Arcade Fire released their sixth studio album WE in May.

ADVERTISEMENT

Four people accuse Arcade Fire’s Win Butler of sexual misconduct

Four people accuse Arcade Fire’s Win Butler of sexual misconduct
Butler has issued a statement acknowledging relationships with four people.

By David Renshaw

August 29, 2022

Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images.

Win Butler of Arcade Fire has been accused of sexual misconduct by multiple people, Pitchfork reports. The frontman, who is married to fellow band member Régine Chassagne, has stated that it is his belief that the relationships were consensual and that any claims of misconduct are “revisionist, and frankly just wrong.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Speaking to Pitchfork, three women and one gender-fluid person share similar stories. All were fans of Arcade Fire and aged between 18 and 23 when they met Butler. The alleged incidents occurred between 2015 and 2020, when Butler was between 34 and 39. The three women claim that the age gap, plus Butler’s position as the lead singer in a Grammy-winning band, created an unbalanced power dynamic.

Read Next:

Lily, a pseudonym given to the gender-fluid person, said they believed Butler had sexually assaulted them. Lily first met Butler in 2015 and alleged that he grabbed their crotch in a car. They also claim he pinned them against a wall before “sticking his tongue down my throat.” Butler said he had touched Lily on the thigh in the car and stated that the second incident was “definitely mutual.”

ADVERTISEMENT

In a statement given to Pitchfork, Butler said he was “very sorry to anyone who I have hurt with my behaviour” but claimed his relationships with the four individuals were consensual. He added that he had gone through a period of drinking and depression during the 2015-2020 time period the relationships took place.

“I am continuing to learn from my mistakes and working hard to become a better person, someone my son can be proud of […] I’m sorry I wasn’t more aware and tuned in to the effect I have on people – I fucked up, and while not an excuse, I will continue to look forward and heal what can be healed, and learn from past experiences, Butler said”

In a separate statement, Chassagne said she was “certain” he had never touched a woman without consent. She added: “He has lost his way and he has found his way back. I love him and love the life we have created together.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Arcade Fire released their latest album WE earlier this year. The band are scheduled to tour Europe in September before making their way across North America later in the fall.

Arcade Fire’s tour will continue in spite of Win Butler’s sexual misconduct allegations

Arcade Fire’s tour will continue in spite of Win Butler’s sexual misconduct allegations
The band is proceeding with its planned dates, a source tells The FADER.

By Jordan Darville

August 29, 2022

Arcade Fire. Photo credit: María José Govea

 

Over the weekend, Pitchfork reported multiple sexual misconduct allegations against Win Butler, frontman of Canadian indie rock institution Arcade Fire. Butler denied any non-consensual sexual activity – in a statement issued through a representative, he called such characterizations “revisionist, and frankly just wrong” and offered an apology. “I’m sorry I wasn’t more aware and tuned in to the effect I have on people,” Butler said. “I fucked up, and while not an excuse, I will continue to look forward and heal what can be healed, and learn from past experiences.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The allegations do not appear to have had any effect on Arcade Fire’s upcoming tour of the United Kingdom, Europe, and North America. A well-placed source has informed The FADER that the dates are still scheduled to proceed as planned, with the first date scheduled for Dublin’s 3Arena on August 30. Beck and Feist, the previously announced support acts, have not made any statements on the allegations or their plans for the upcoming dates. The FADER has reached out to their representatives for more information, and we will update this new post if any new information emerges.

Read Next:

Arcade Fire released their latest album WE in May and performed a surprise set at Coachella this year.

ADVERTISEMENT

Ezra Furman writes simple songs “for the mind to stretch out in”

Ezra Furman writes simple songs “for the mind to stretch out in”

The constantly evolving singer-songwriter joined The FADER Interview on Amp in July to discuss her new album, All Of Us Flames, out today.

By Raphael Helfand

August 26, 2022

Tonje Thielsen

It’s rare nowadays to find sincere protest music worth listening to. Even those elite artists who do make legitimately radical statements in their songs — Downtown Boys, Moor Mother, Special Interest, et al. — mix their full-throated activism with experiments in form. But on her recent single “Book Of Our Names,” Ezra Furman takes a direct swing at capitalism in the style of the earnest folk rockers who shook the structures of power over half a century ago. “I want there to be / A book of our names / None of them missing / None quite the same,” she sings in the track’s bookending refrain. “None of us ashes / All of us flames / And I want us / To read it aloud.” Her words hit with a refreshing honesty, like opening a gift you’ve been expecting but are moved by nonetheless.

ADVERTISEMENT

All of Us Flames, out today on ANTI- and Bella Union, will be the final installment in a trilogy of albums that also comprises 2018’s Transangelic Exodus and 2019’s Twelve Nudes. Their serialization was retrospective, determined by Furman after Flames’ recording was finished, but it makes sense: Unlike her earlier, equally brilliant but less emphatic work, these three records play as direct challenges to a patriarchal system teetering on the precipice of extinction.

Read Next:

“This is a first person plural album,” Furman wrote in a statement accompanying the release of the project’s fourth single, “Lilac and Black,” earlier this month. “It’s a queer album for the stage of life when you start to understand that you are not a lone wolf, but depend on finding your family, your people, how you work as part of a larger whole. I wanted to make songs for use by threatened communities, and particularly the ones I belong to: trans people and Jews.”

ADVERTISEMENT

With all this in mind, Furman and I went live on Amp Radio in late July for a special episode of The FADER Interview. Our conversation moved from her new songs to our favorite artists in the protest music canon (Nina Simone), the best Jewish musical storytellers (David Berman), and the societal value of songwriting.

Tonje Thielsen

ADVERTISEMENT

The FADER: Ezra, how’s it going?

Ezra Furman: How’s it going? Wow. I prefer to start with smalltalk, but if you really wanna get heavy so immediately… It’s very intense to be a human being, very intense.

You’re in London, right?

ADVERTISEMENT

Yes. Just currently, by chance, so it’s late at night. Have I had a frozen margarita? I have.

That’s one good way to deal with the heat. How else have you gotten through this wave?

I played with a toddler in a kiddie pool, and we sprayed each other with a hose in a little backyard… And just pure American grit, because I’ve got that on my side.

ADVERTISEMENT

You’re releasing a new album next month called All Of Us Flames, and we just heard what will be its fourth track, “Forever in Sunset.” I heard some shades of Springsteen and a bit of Arcade Fire. It’s very open-ended.

What usually happens is I write the songs as finished pieces, and then I bring them to the band, and then we collaborate and make them into a full production. This one came from my drummer and dear friend, Sam Durkes, who recorded those chords and that riff. It sounded great because he makes these cool demos with guitar pedals and plugins, and when I heard it I was like, “Okay, I know what to do.” It’s a rare co-written song in my catalog.

ADVERTISEMENT

A lot of your career has been defined by you being a very solo, auteurish singer/songwriter. Would you say this album was generally more collaborative than your previous ones?

Well, I’ve had this band together since 2012. We just hit our 10-year anniversary. So, in a way, they’ve all been quite collaborative, but there is something more so about this one. I unclenched with the control freak aspect of my musicianship.

ADVERTISEMENT

I developed that tendency to be a little too controlling, too obsessive about all the details being just how I want them, and I let go a little bit [this time]. I think it’s both that I’m so comfortable with these three guys in my band and that I was so confident in the songs we wrote. To toot my own, of course, I’ve got good taste. I know when things are good. Somehow, I can even tell when my own things are decent. I do think I’ll get better at this as I go, at least by my own standards. I’m better at meeting my own standards, which also keep getting higher and higher.

You’ve said you see your last three albums, from Transangelic Exodus to Twelve Nudes and now All Of Us Flames, as a trilogy. What do you see as the connective tissue between them?

I only realized it was a trilogy in retrospect, once the third one was done. I didn’t plan it out that way or anything. When we made Transangelic Exodus, my whole focus as a writer became more widescreen. It wasn’t only a personal document anymore; it started to be a kind of spiritual and emotional check-in with civilization at large. That’s the only thing I really did on purpose — follow the content of my soul. And it stopped just being about who I was dating and started to be more about… Nazis.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Book Of Our Names” is a pretty straight-ahead protest song. You don’t hear too many of those nowadays, or at least not too many good ones. It reminds me especially of the Woodstock-era records my parents would play when I was a kid, but obviously, there were great protest songs made long before then, and long after, too. Do you have a favorite?

ADVERTISEMENT

The first thing that comes to mind is “Mississippi Goddam” by Nina Simone. In terms of protest singers — and singers in general — I can’t really think of anyone better than her. She’s one of the great lights of 20th century culture, full stop, and such a huge inspiration to me.

When I think of the best protest songs, I want them to not only be incisive and have something important to say about what they’re protesting, but also have other things going for them and be extremely inventive. There’s things about “Mississippi Goddam” I’ve never heard other songs quite do. The version I know best is where she’s doing it live and she says… Oh, shoot, I can’t remember exactly, I’m gonna misquote it. I like how strident it is, but it’s also despairing: “I’ve even stopped believing in prayer.” “You’re all gonna to die and die like flies.” It’s so angry and so sad, and also funny. It’s the best of all those emotions, rapid fire. How do you write something like that? I’m so stunned by it.

This is a show tune, but the show hasn’t been written yet.

ADVERTISEMENT

That’s the one I was trying to remember!

Speaking of all-time one-liners, there’s one on “American Soil,” from your first solo album: “I’m a Jew through and through, and I’m about to write you a Bible.” Tell me the story behind that one.

That was a long time ago now. I probably wrote that way back in 2010. I guess I was trying to be bold. I was getting into those people who can really throw down a line. There’s a lot of different things that can be good in a song, and one of them is a line you’ll never forget. I heard this one Warren Zevon song recently called “Empty Hearted Town,” and this opening line just blew me away: He says, “Ain’t life strange? Ain’t it funny? / Nothing matters much but love and money.” I was like, “How do you write that? How do the greats do it? As literature, what is a song?” That’s the mystery I’m working on understanding.

ADVERTISEMENT

As a Jew myself, I see you as part of the great, long tradition of Jewish storytellers. My favorite songwriter from that is probably David Berman. I would assume you’re a big Silver Jews fan, but I don’t want to assume. Are you?

ADVERTISEMENT

Huge. This album was very influenced [by David Berman]. After he died in the summer of 2019, it started to dawn on a lot of people that this was one of the great writers we had, and the closer you look at his work, it just gets richer and richer — a beautiful mind, a great writer.

Do you have a favorite Silver Jews or Purple Mountains song?

I love “Smith & Jones Forever.” I was particularly inspired by their last record, Lookout Mountain, Lookout Sea. A great thing about that one is — and he talked about this in a lot of interviews — he said he had a dream of writing songs that only used the 1,000 most common words in the English language. 1,000 sounds like a lot, but when it comes to language, it’s very, very few. He has a song on that called “What Is Not But Could Be If,” and to me it represents a pared-down vocabulary and a spartan use of language that I think is much more difficult than your hyper-literate, David Foster Wallace style. It’s appealing to me how sometimes simpler writing can contain so much more because its simplicity leaves it open for the mind to stretch out in.

ADVERTISEMENT

That’s what got me into blues and country — simple stuff that can be so powerful. I don’t think I’ve attained anything like that stark, spartan, almost heroic simplicity, but I think it’s a good influence to take in sometimes if you went to freaking college. When I was an English major, I learned too many words — more words than I needed.

Back to classic one-liners and David Berman for a moment, he has one in almost every song. One of my favorites, from “Frontier Index,” is “Robot walks into a bar / Orders a drink, lays down a bill / Bartender says, ‘Hey, we don’t serve robots’ / And the robot says, ‘Oh, but someday you will.’”

He’s so funny. It’s good to put jokes in songs. It makes them better, usually. But there’s a line on “That’s Just the Way That I Feel,” the first song on his last album, Purple Mountains… It’s so beautifully constructed, it leaves me gasping: “And when I see her in the park / It barely merits a remark / The way we stand the standard distance / Distant strangers stand apart.” It’s the kind of thing that just goes by the first time you hear it. But if you look at it as an appreciator of poetry or as a writer, it has a symmetry that I am just like, “I need to know, how do you do that? Did that just come out all of a sudden, or does that take six months to finish?” That kind of thing is just such a jewel. It’s like a piece of origami. I want to get like that as a writer somehow. That’s my dream.

ADVERTISEMENT

Berman’s music wasn’t usually as directly political as yours has been lately, but he did quit music cold turkey in an attempt to right some of the wrongs that his father — an anti-union lawyer and a lobbyist for industries like alcohol, big tobacco, and guns — had done to the world. Have you ever had a moment where you felt that way, that the music wasn’t doing enough?

ADVERTISEMENT

I feel that often. There are lots of ways to answer that anxiety. I think the anxiety that you’re not doing enough is useful to the point that it makes you effectively do more. If it’s not having that effect, if it’s just making you anxious, there’s no point in it at all. It’s slowing you down. I think artists… Well, I think a lot of people tend to denigrate the value of their work. They look at activists or politicians, and they’re like, “Well, those people are doing something that matters, and I’m doing my stupid work, and who cares?” But it takes all kinds of work to hold civilization together, and I don’t think we should denigrate the work that people do so easily, so swiftly. It’s starting to feel disrespectful to other people that I would disrespect my own work as vacuous in that way.

Now, having said that… If you look globally, I’ve got more money than most. I’ve got more spare time than a lot of people. I’ve got more power than a lot of people, and I’ve got more reach than a lot of people. Those are things you have to use in a positive way to do something for somebody else, and I try to. I do something like my best.

As I said when you asked how I am, it’s an intense situation, and I like to remember that. I like to refuse complacency with that. I think the idea for a religious Jew, which is what I am, is to try to continue growing throughout one’s life, keep learning how you can be more of a healing presence and do more to honor God’s world and the precious, irreplaceable people that God puts on the world. Everyone is precious and irreplaceable and infinitely valuable, and I’ve tried to live honoring that idea. The other part of it is that we all fail at that task, no matter how hard we try. Failure is a part of life.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Weeknd, Arcade Fire, PUP longlisted for 2022 Polaris Prize

The Weeknd, Arcade Fire, PUP longlisted for 2022 Polaris Prize
Previous winners Tanya Tagaq and Backxwash also made the cut for Canada’s album of the year.

By David Renshaw

June 15, 2022

Amy Sussman/Rich Fury/Getty

Organizers of The Polaris Prize, Canada’s annual event crowning the best album to come out of the country that year, have revealed the projects longlisted for this year’s prize. Among the artists long-listed for 2022 include Arcade Fire and The Weeknd, previous winners Tanya Tagaq and Backxwash, plus BadBadNotGood, Charlotte Day Wilson, Luna Li, Orville Peck, PUP, Hubert Lenoir, Men I Trust, and Destroyer.

ADVERTISEMENT

The longlist, see in full below, will be cut down to a smaller selection of nominees in July before the winner is revealed at a ceremony in September. The winner picks up $50,000 and is determined by a group of writers, programmers, and broadcasters. Last year, Cadence Weapon won for his album Parallel World.

Read Next:

Polaris Music Prize Long List 2022:

ADVERTISEMENT

Ada Lea, One Hand on the Steering Wheel the Other Sewing a Garden
Adria Kain, When Flowers Bloom
Ahi, Prospect
Arcade Fire, WE
Backxwash, I Lie Here Buried With My Rings and My Dresses
BadBadNotGood, Talk Memory
Basia Bulat, The Garden
Cedric Noel, Hang Time
Charlotte Day Wilson, Alpha
Chiiild, Hope for Sale
Destroyer, Labyrinthitis
The Garrys, Get Thee to a Nunnery
The Halluci Nation, One More Saturday Night
Haviah Mighty, Stock Exchange
Hubert Lenoir, Pictura de Ipse : Musique Directe
Jean-Michel Blais, Aubades
Joyful Joyful, Joyful Joyful
Julie Doiron, I Thought of You
Kelly McMichael, Waves
Les Louanges, Crash
Lisa Leblanc, Chiac Disco
Loony, soft thing
Luna Li, Duality
Lydia Képinski, Depuis
Men I Trust, Untourable Album
Myst Milano, Shapeshyfter
Ombiigizi, Sewn Back Together
Orville Peck, Bronco
Ouri, Frame of a Fauna
Pierre Kwenders, José Louis and the Paradox of Love
P’tit Belliveau, Un homme et son piano
PUP, The Unraveling of PUPTheBand
Sate, The Fool
Shad, Tao
Sister Ray, Communion
Snotty Nose Rez Kids, Life After
Stars, From Capelton Hill
Tanika Charles, Papillon de Nuit: The Night Butterfly
Tanya Tagaq, Tongues
The Weeknd, Dawn FM

Arcade Fire announce fall 2022 tour

Arcade Fire announce fall 2022 tour
The news arrives today alongside the band’s sixth studio LP, WE.

By Raphael Helfand

May 06, 2022

Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images.

 

Arcade Fire dropped WE, their sixth studio album, today, and they’ve now followed its release with the announcement of an international tour this fall. Scheduled well in advance, the European and North American runs follow a string of surprise and short-notice sets — in their adopted hometown of New Orleans and on the first night of Coachella last month. They’re also slated to perform on this week’s episode of Saturday Night Live.

ADVERTISEMENT

Their newly announced WE tour is set to start August 30 in Dublin with special guest Feist, who will move slowly east with the band until the start of October. They’ll pick up again stateside in Washington, D.C. at the end of the month with Beck playing acoustic sets in support of the trip’s North American leg.

Read Next:

View the tour’s poster and full schedule below.

ADVERTISEMENT

Arcade Fire WE tour poster.

 

Arcade Fire WE tour

August 30 – Dublin, IE – 3Arena *
September 2 – Birmingham, UK – Utilita Arena Birmingham *
September 3 – Manchester, UK – AO Arena *
September 5 – Glasgow, UK – OVO Hydro *
September 8 – London, UK – The O2 *
September 11 – Lille, FR – Zenith*
September 12 – Antwerp, BE – Sportpaleis *
September 14 – Cologne, DE – Lanxess Arena *
September 15 – Paris, FR – Accor Arena *
September 17 – Milan, IT – Mediolanum Forum *
September 18 – Munich, DE – Olympiahalle *
September 21 – Madrid, ES – WiZink Center *
September 22 – Lisbon, PT – Campo Pequeno *
September 23 – Lisbon, PT – Campo Pequeno *
September 25 – Bordeaux, FR – Arkea Arena *
September 26 – Nantes, FR – Zenith de Nantes *
September 28 – Amsterdam, NL – Ziggo Dome *
September 29 – Berlin, DE – Mercedes-Benz Arena *
October 1- Warsaw, PL – COS Torwar *

ADVERTISEMENT

October 28 – Washington, DC – The Anthem ^
November 1 – Camden, NJ – Waterfront Music Pavilion ^
November 4 – Brooklyn, NY – Barclays Center ^
November 8 – Boston, MA – MGM Fenway Music Hall ^
November 10 – Uncasville, CT – Mohegan Sun Arena ^
November 12 – Chicago, IL – United Center ^
November 13 – Minneapolis, MN – The Armory ^
November 16 – Los Angeles, CA – The Kia Forum ^
November 19 – San Francisco, CA – Bill Graham Civic Auditorium ^
November 22 – Seattle, WA – Climate Pledge Arena ^
November 25 – Vancouver, BC – Rogers Arena ^
November 27 – Edmonton, AB – Rogers Place ^
December 1 – Toronto, ON – Scotiabank Arena ^

* with special guest Feist
^ with special guest Beck (acoustic)

ADVERTISEMENT

Arcade Fire share “Unconditional I (Lookout Kid)”

Arcade Fire share “Unconditional I (Lookout Kid)”
It’s the second single from their sixth album, WE, due out May 6 on Columbia Records.

By Raphael Helfand

April 27, 2022

Photo by María José Govea.

 

Arcade Fire are just over a week away from the scheduled release of their sixth studio LP, WE. Announced in March along with the arrival of its first single, “The Lightning I, II,” the record will be their first since 2017’s Everything Now. Today, they’ve shared its second offering, “Unconditional I (Lookout Kid),” a track they teased in their surprise April 15 Coachella set.

ADVERTISEMENT

The new song opens with a simmering violin that breaks open into some spirited acoustic strumming, setting the tone for a gentle pep talk to younger generations from bandleader Win Butler. It will appear on the side B of the album, which, according to a press release “channels and revels in the power and joy of human (re)connection.”

Read Next:

“There’s nothing saccharine about unconditional love in a world that is coming apart at the seams,” Butler says. “WE need each other, in all of our imperfection. ‘Lookout Kid’ is a reminder, a lullaby for the end times, sung to my son, but for everyone… Trust your heart, trust your mind, trust your body, trust your soul. Shit is going to get worse before it gets better, but it always gets better, and no one’s perfect. Let me say it again. No one’s perfect.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Listen below.

ADVERTISEMENT

Arcade Fire will play Coachella 2022 tomorrow

Arcade Fire will play Coachella 2022 tomorrow
The group was a late, surprise addition to the April 15 schedule.

By Raphael Helfand

April 14, 2022

Photo by Jeff Schear/Getty Images.

 

Arcade Fire have favored the element of surprise on the release cycle of their sixth studio album, WE. In mid-March, they played a Ukraine benefit concert in their adopted hometown of New Orleans on one night’s notice and followed it up the same week with news of their forthcoming record — due out May 6 via Columbia — and the release of “Lightning I, II,” their first official single in nearly five years. On April 1, they headlined the first night of the 2022 NCAA March Madness Music Festival (pictured above). And today, they slid without fanfare into the Friday, April 15 Coachella 2022 lineup.

ADVERTISEMENT

The group’s set is scheduled to run 6:45–7:45 p.m. Pacific time at the Indio, California festival’s Mojave Tent. A representative for the band confirmed to The FADER that they will indeed play tomorrow but that they will not repeat their performance on the festival’s second weekend.

Read Next:

Arcade Fire is not the Coachella organizers’ only late addition: Last week, the Weeknd came on as a headliner and Swedish House Mafia were promoted to co-headliners, joining Billie Eilish and Harry Styles at the top of the bill after Kanye West dropped out of the festival on short notice.

ADVERTISEMENT

Arcade Fire announce sixth album, share “Lightning I, II”

Arcade Fire announce sixth album, share “Lightning I, II”
WE is due out May 6 on Colubia Records.

By Raphael Helfand

March 17, 2022

Photo by Michael Marcelle.

 

Arcade Fire have had a relatively quiet half decade, but they announced Monday that they’d be playing a surprise Ukraine benefit concert in New Orleans that night, and that they’d share their first official song in nearly five years later in the week. With “Lightning I, II” dropping today, they’ve now followed through on both of these promises and made another, larger one: WE, the group’s sixth studio album — and their first since the polarizing 2017 record Everything Now — is set to arrive May 6 via Columbia Records.

ADVERTISEMENT

Produced by Nigel Godrich along with bandleaders Win Butler and Regine Chassagne at studios in New Orleans, El Paso, and Mount Desert Island, Maine, the album is split into Side “I” and Side “WE.” Two of its tracks come with separately listed sequels, leaving only “Empire I–IV,” the title track, and the new song as standalones. All in, the project will clock in at 40 minutes. But despite its segmented recording process and ultimate consision, Win says WE is the product of “the longest we’ve ever spent writing, uninterrupted, probably ever.”

Read Next:

Arcade Fire’s current studio lineup consists of Richard Reed Parry, Tim Kingsbury, Jeremy Gara, and Will Butler, along with Regine and Win. Live band members Dan Boeckner, Paul Beaubrun, and Sarah Neufeld also appear onstage in the Emily Kai Bock-directed visual treatment for “Lightning I, II” — a cinematic, black-and-white affair that parallels the song’s slow-building tension and cathartic release with an epic storm that breaks over the musicians as they reach the peak of their crescendo.

ADVERTISEMENT

Watch it, view the records cover art and tracklist, and read a philosophical note from Win on the forthcoming record below.

ADVERTISEMENT

WE cover art by JR.

 

WE tracklist

“I”

Age of Anxiety I
Age of Anxiety II (Rabbit Hole)
End of the Empire I-IV

ADVERTISEMENT

“WE”

The Lightning I, II
Unconditional I (Lookout Kid)
Unconditional II (Race and Religion)
WE

Arcade Fire announce new song and Ukraine benefit concert

Arcade Fire announce new song and Ukraine benefit concert
“The Lightning I, II” drops Thursday and the show is tonight, at New Orleans’ Toulouse Theatre.

By Raphael Helfand

March 14, 2022

Photo by Andrew Chin/Getty Images.

 

Arcade Fire have been largely quiet at the national level since their fifth studio album, 2017’s Everything Now, received mixed reviews and their subsequent arena tour sold disastrously few tickets. They’ve released no new music since then, aside from a cover of “Baby Mine” for Tim Burton’s 2019 Dumbo remake and a 45-minute meditation track for the Headspace app. In their adopted hometown of New Orleans, however, bandleaders Win Butler and Regine Chassagnes have become prominent figures; their Krewe du Kanava, based on Hiatian cultural traditions, has gained popularity for its Mardi Gras ball and second line parades, but also notoriety for what some locals claim is cultural appropriation, though Chassagnes is the daughter of Haitian immigrants.

ADVERTISEMENT

Last night, close to midnight CDT, the band announced a surprise concert taking place tonight at New Orleans’ Toulouse Theatre (fka One Eyed Jacks), with wristbands available now for in-person pickup at the venue. All proceeds from the show will go to Plus1‘s Ukraine Relief Fund.

Read Next:

Hours later, the band shared that they’ll be dropping a new song titled “The Lightning I, II” on Thursday, their first original single since the Everything Now debacle. It could be a sign of the imminent album Butler and Co. have been teasing for two years, potentially joining “Generation A” — a still-unreleased song they premiered on Stephen Colbert’s 2020 election night special — on the to-be-announced album’s to-be-manifested tracklist.

ADVERTISEMENT

View both of today’s full announcements below.

👀 pic.twitter.com/yM7SzjtD4F

— Arcade Fire (@arcadefire) March 14, 2022

ADVERTISEMENT

Our new song The Lightning I, II comes out on Thursday 2PM ET/11AM PT.
Pre-save: https://t.co/n7uhcMkTGr
Here’s the chords to make it a little easier to play.
WE really missed you⚡️
❤️
AF pic.twitter.com/m4IJ2hZ73t

— Arcade Fire (@arcadefire) March 14, 2022

Hear every song mentioned in David Byrne’s episode of The FADER Uncovered

Hear every song mentioned in David Byrne’s episode of The FADER Uncovered
All 46 songs, from Arcade Fire to Sly & The Family Stone.

By David Renshaw

May 26, 2021

The third full episode of The FADER Uncovered, a brand new podcast series in which host Mark Ronson talks with the world’s most impactful musicians, is up now and available for download wherever you listen to podcasts. This week Ronson sits down with David Byrne, the Talking Heads founder whose whose music has led the way for multiple generations of artists. Together they discussed Byrne’s stunning Broadway show American Utopia plus his work with Brian Eno on 2008 album Everything That Happens Will Happen Today.

ADVERTISEMENT

The two also bring up lots of music across the episode, referencing songs by Arcade Fire, Radiohead, Sly & The Family Stone, and many more during their conversation. To make that all easier to navigate, we’ve dropped it all into a 46-song playlist, which you can check out below.

Read Next:

Follow and subscribe to The FADER Uncovered here, check out this week’s episode with Questlove here, and check back for new episodes every Monday.

ADVERTISEMENT